This week is National Payroll Week, and the annual event marks a perfect time to look at the latest trends in paychecks so you can make sure you’re offering employees the best options to keep morale high. Here are some recent payroll developments that are shaping workplaces today. Paycards: These reloadable pre-paid cards onto which

Should You Go Gray?

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, the labor force participation rate is expected to increase fastest for the oldest segments of the population—most notably, people ages 65 to 74 and 75 and older—through 2024. With this changing composition of the workforce, should your company capitalize on the trend? Here are five reasons you may want

Each year, legal and regulatory changes can impact everything from the amount of payroll taxes you have to pay and your withholding requirements to minimum wage and deductions for certain benefits—complicating an already challenging task. Here’s what you need to know to ensure correct calculations this year. Minimum Wage: While the federal rate remains unchanged

Physical checks may be the more traditional method of compensating employees, but they can also be costly to ship, delayed due to weather or other unforeseen circumstances, and cause inconvenience that creates stress for both employers and employees. That’s why many companies today are ditching their reliance on paper and offering paperless payroll instead. Here

One of the most popular benefits continues to be 401(k) plans. According to the latest SHRM annual employee benefits survey, 93 percent of organizations offer traditional 401(k)s or defined retirement savings plans, up from 90 percent the previous year. But while they’re a sought-after perk for employees, administering the plans can be a challenge for

Cybersecurity is a growing concern among businesses of all sizes, especially when even large companies like Equifax and Target are hit by data breaches. Tony Frye, Complete Payroll Solutions’ IT Director, answers common questions about ensuring the security of workers’ personal information.

It’s never too early for young employees to start saving for retirement. But rising healthcare costs, inflation, and increased longevity can make it challenging to know just what an individual will require to retire comfortably. Employers can help younger workers prepare for retirement planning through employer-sponsored plans such as 401(k)s and  Health Savings Accounts (HSAs).